Foucault panopticism

It is no surprise that the cellular, observational prison is the modern penal instrument, or that prisons resemble factories, schools and hospitals. Analysis In many ways, this is the heart of the book. For Foucault, the panopticon represents the way in which discipline and punishment work in modern society.

Foucault panopticism

Tuesday, 4 September Disciplinary Power: Within these technologies are two representations of punishment; Monarchal Punishment referring to the public and torturous punishment practices present during and prior to the 18th century, and Disciplinary Punishment which refers to the incarceration of offenders and their subjection to the power of the prison officers.

From the SparkNotes Blog

Guards however will not always be observing each inmate to check they are behaving and following the rules. As inmates are not sure whether they are being watched at any one time, they must always act in accordance to the rules.

Control is thus achieved through self-surveillance as the fear of being caught breaking the rules keeps them in line with expectations. Foucault saw panopticism as present in many institutions, not just the prison system.

Institutions such as asylums, schools, military and secret services also adopt a panoptic way of disciplining, with constant surveillance acting to maintain control of those within them. As behaviour becomes normalised, expectations of how one is to act in public soon translates into the private sphere where these expectations are no longer applicable.

Take for example the behaviour performed when you are sick. In the public sphere, it would be expected that you would cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or elbow to stop germs from spreading into the air or onto surfaces.Cultural Landscapes Bibliography. Return to Bibliography.

Michel Foucault. “Panopticism (Excerpt)” in Rethinking Architecture: A Reader in Cultural Theory.

Foucault panopticism

Neil Leach, ed. Foucault’s main concern in this rather short piece is the organization of power in terms of space. Foucault central observation hall, but, on the inside, partitions that intersected the hall at right angles and, in order to pass from one quarter to the other, not doors but zig-zag openings; for the slightest noise, a gleam of light, a brightness in a half­ opened door would betray the presence of the guardian.

Panopticism is the general principle of a new "political anatomy" whose object and end are not the relations of sovereignty but the relations of discipline.

Foucault’s Panopticism and Its Application Within Modern Education Systems Words | 7 Pages. Panopticism, a social theory based on Jeremy Bentham’s Panopticon and developed by Michel Foucault describes a disciplinary mechanism used in various aspects of society.

A summary of Panopticism in Michel Foucault's Discipline and Punish.

SparkNotes: Discipline and Punish: Panopticism, page 2

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Discipline and Punish and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Foucault saw panopticism as present in many institutions, not just the prison system. Institutions such as asylums, schools, military and secret services also adopt a panoptic way of disciplining, with constant surveillance acting to maintain control of those within them.

Michel Foucault: Disciplinary Power: Panopticism